Ming C. Wu (Advisor)

Research Advised by Professor Ming C. Wu

Anthony Yeh

Alumni
Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences
Professor Ming C. Wu (Advisor)
Ph.D. 2014

Alejandro Griñe

Alumni
Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences
Professor Ming C. Wu (Advisor)
Ph.D. 2014

Low Noise, Low Power Cavity Optomechanical Oscillators

Alejandro Griñe
Ming C. Wu
Liwei Lin
Constance Chang-Hasnain
2014

Cavity Optomechanical oscillators (OMOs) rely on photon radiation pressure to induce harmonic mechanical motion of a micron-scale light resonator. Unlike most oscillators, optomechanical oscillators require only CW input light without the need for electronic feedback and so hold promise for their novelty. In an optical cavity of sufficient quality factor, the transduction from photons to phonons can be quite efficient as we characterized optomechanical cavities which only required 17 microwatt input optical power to induce mechanical oscillation. The question then remains whether OMOs can...

FMCW Lidar: Scaling to the Chip-Level and Improving Phase-Noise-Limited Performance

Phillip Sandborn
Ming C. Wu
Bernhard Boser
Kristofer S.J. Pister
Liwei Lin
2017

Lidar (light detection and ranging) technology has the potential to revolutionize the way automated systems interact with their environments and their users. Most lidar systems in the industry today rely on pulsed (or, "time-of-flight") lidar, which has reached limits in terms of depth resolution. Coherent lidar schemes, such as frequency-modulated continuous-wave (FMCW) lidar, offer significant advantage in achieving high depth resolution, but are often too complex, too expensive, and/or too bulky to be implemented in the consumer industry. FMCW, and its close cousin, swept-source optical...

Novel Processing Schemes for Material Systems on Amorphous and Flexible Substrates

Kevin Chen
Ali Javey
Ming C. Wu
Daryl Chrzan
2017

With the rise of the Internet of Things (IOT), demand for novel devices and sensors for a variety of applications has exploded, and as a result, there is a need for the development of new processing schemes and materials systems to accommodate the expanding needs of these applications. In particular,

Chapter 2 explores the growth of III-V semiconductors with quality approaching that of epitaxial thin films directly onto amorphous substrates using a new growth mode known as template liquid phase (TLP) crystal growth. The fundamental theory and limitations of TLP...

Non-Epitaxial Thin-Film Indium Phosphide Photovoltaics: Growth, Devices, and Cost Analysis

Maxwell Zheng
Ali Javey
Ming C. Wu
Roya Maboudian
2015

In recent years, the photovoltaic market has grown significantly as module prices have continued to come down. Continued growth of the field requires higher efficiency modules at lower manufacturing costs. In particular, higher efficiencies reduce the area needed for a given power output, thus reducing the downstream balance of systems costs that scale with area such as mounting frames, installation, and soft costs. Cells and modules made from III-V materials have the highest demonstrated efficiencies to date but are not yet at the cost level of other thin film technologies, which...

Optofluidic Devices for Droplet and Cell Manipulation

Shao Ning Pei
Ming C. Wu
Michel M. Maharbiz
Amy Herr
2015

The field of lab-on-a-chip offers exciting new capabilities for chemical and biological assays, including increased automation, higher throughput, heightened sensitivity of detection, and reduced sample and reagent usage. This area of study has seen remarkable progress in the last decade, with applications ranging from drug development to point-of-care diagnostics. The research presented herein focuses on the development of semiconductor-based optoelectrowetting (OEW) and optoelectronic tweezers (OET) platforms, which can respectively perform operations on droplets and cells/...

Shao Ning Pei

Alumni
Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences
Professor Ming C. Wu (Advisor)
Ph.D. 2015

Ryan Going

Alumni
Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences
Professor Ming C. Wu (Advisor)
Ph.D. 2015

Ultra-Low Energy Photoreceivers for Optical Interconnects

Ryan Going
Ming C. Wu
Eli Yablonovich
Constance Chang-Hasnain
Junqiao Wu
2015

Optical interconnects are increasingly important for our communication and data center systems, and are forecasted to be an essential component of future computers. In order to meet these future demands, optical interconnects must be improved to consume less power than they do today. To do this, both more effcient transmitters and more sensitive receivers must be developed. This work addresses the latter, focusing on device level improvements to tightly couple a low capacitance photodiode with the first...