Michel M. Maharbiz (Advisor)

Research Advised by Professor Michel M. Maharbiz

BPN890: Hydrogel Actuated Carbon Fiber Microelectrode Array

Oliver Chen
2022

Glial scarring and passivization of long-term implanted neural probes is one bottleneck in brain- machine interface technology. However, ultraflexible probes with similar mechanical properties as tissue have been shown to minimize scarring and other biological responses. We propose a flexible, microscale neural probe that can be actuated using an expanding hydrogel. This device is designed to be able to record neural signals up to hundreds of microns away from the insertion site. This design can allow for high-density, accurate neural recordings for a wide variety of clinical applications...

Oliver Chen

Graduate Student Researcher
Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences
Professor Michel M. Maharbiz (Advisor)
Ph.D. 2022 (Anticipated)

Oliver graduated with the B.S. degree in Electrical Engineering from the California Institute of Technology in 2016. He is currently working on hydrogel actuated carbon fiber microelectrode arrays in as an EECS PhD student at the University of California, Berkeley with Prof. Michel Maharbiz. He is a recipient of the NSF Graduate Research Fellowship.

Oliver is interested in biomedical device technology related to both systems-level design and MEMS devices. This includes microfabrication and implementation of implantable devices, in particular, neural probes for brain-machine...

BPN970: Rotary Inchworm Motor for Underwater Microrobot Propulsion

Mauricio J. Bustamante
2022

Autonomous swimming microrobots for biomedical applications and distributed sensing require locally controllable swimming mechanisms. This project aims to develop underwater, rotary electrostatic inchworm motors for artificial flagella. Our proposed design uses gap closing actuators with an angle arm design, similar to existing inchworm motors, to drive a central rotor, all fabricated with an SOI process. An artificial flagella is attached the rotor, converting the rotational motion into propulsion. Major challenges include efficient operation of electrostatic motors underwater and...

BPN924: Multimodality Platform for Neurogenesis and Neural Signal Recording After Stroke

Wentian Mi
2022

Stroke is a leading cause of disability in the United States. Recovery from stroke is complex and ultimately limited by the brains limited ability to regenerate damaged tissue. Ideally, we would want to drive neurogenesis and angiogenesis in a stroke lesion to aid in recovery. We propose a multimodality platform for stimulating neurogenesis which simultaneously allows for electrophysiological recording of neurons in the lesion area after stroke. Our aim is to provide a paradigm for making complex substrates for nervous tissue. With various devices integrated, multiple functions can be...

BPN848: Wireless Neural Sensors: Robust Ultrasonic Backscatter Communication in the Brain

David Piech
2021

Brain-machine interfaces provide an artificial conduit to send information to and from the brain, and modulate activity in the brain. These systems have shown great promise in clinical, scientific, and human-computer interaction contexts, but the low reward/risk ratio of today’s invasive neural interfaces has limited their use to an extremely niche clinical patient population. It has been shown that ultrasonic backscatter communication can enable the sensing and stimulation of neural activity with extremely small wireless implants, which can both improve performance and reduce risk....

David Piech

Alumni
Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences
Professor Michel M. Maharbiz (Advisor)
Ph.D. 2021

David’s research activities focus on neural interface devices and brain-machine interface systems, with the goal of enabling wider adoption of these technologies through vastly reduced-risk in-situ neural recording and stimulation modalities.


Previously, he was a research engineer at a private invention lab and tech incubator where he contributed to research in metamaterials-based antennas (spun out as Echodyne, Inc). In addition, he led and worked on projects in close collaboration with the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, including a microfluidic tool to aid in malaria...

BPN871: An Ultrasonic Implantable for Continuous In Vivo Monitoring of Tissue Oxygenation

Soner Sonmezoglu
2022

Our group previously demonstrated a “neural dust” system for neural recording which includes an implantable device and external ultrasonic transducers to power and communicate with the implantable. In this work, we extend that paradigm, demonstrating an implantable that can measure and report tissue oxygenation. Oxygenation state is a key parameter when assessing the metabolic state of cells and tissues, tissue and organ viability, tumor state, among many examples in both basic science and clinical care. Various types of methods for the detection of oxygen have appeared in recent...

Kyoungtae Lee

Alumni
Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences
Professor Michel M. Maharbiz (Advisor)
Ph.D. 2021

Kyoungtae received his B.S. degree in Electrical Engineering from Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST) in 2011 and his M.S. degree from the University of Texas at Austin in 2013, where he worked on designing continuous time delta sigma ADCs. He worked at KAIST IT convergence from 2013 to 2016, designing RF modules for future 5G cellular communication. His current research includes ASIC design for implantable bio-sensor, especially for cancer detection.

Electronic Interfaces for Bacteria-Based Biosensing

Tom Zajdel
Michel M. Maharbiz
2018

Bacterial sensing systems have evolved to detect complex biomolecules, operating near fundamental physical limits for biosensing. No modern engineered biosensor has managed to match the efficiency of bacterial systems, which optimize for each sensing application under constraints on response time and sensitivity. An emerging approach to address this short fallis to build biosensors that electronically couple microbes and devices to combine the sensing capabilities of bacteria with the communication and data processing...