Ming C. Wu (Advisor)

Research Advised by Professor Ming C. Wu

Oxygen Concentration Microgradients for Cell Culture

Jaehyun Park
Michel M. Maharbiz
Ming C. Wu
Amy E. Herr
2010

There is a growing need for technology that can control microscale oxygen gradients onto a tissue or culture sample in vitro. This dissertation introduces the oxygen microgradient chip (OMA), which employs electrolysis to generate oxygen microgradients within cell culture without forming bubbles. Dissolved oxygen generated at noble microelectrodes patterned on a chip surface diffuses through a gas-permeable silicone membrane and is dosed into cell culture. The amount of generated oxygen is directly proportional to a current flowing across the electrodes and thus can be controlled...

Justin Valley

Alumni
Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences
Professor Ming C. Wu (Advisor)
Ph.D. 2011

Light-induced Electrokinetics: A path to a Versatile Micro Total Analysis System

Justin Valley
Ming C. Wu
Michel M. Maharbiz
Amy E. Herr
2011

The micro total analysis system (uTAS) has seen great interest and advances since its definition over two decades ago. By harnessing the fabrication tools of the semiconductor industry and exploiting the unique physical phenomena that dominate at the micro- to nano-scale, these devices aim to address applications ranging from point-of-care diagnostics to pharmaceutical development. A truly versatile uTAS technology platform will enable reconfigurable, parallel, and high resolution analysis, processing, and sorting/purification. To this end, we present the concept of light-induced...

Amit Lakhani

Alumni
Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences
Professor Ming C. Wu (Advisor)
Ph.D. 2012

High Resolution Additive Patterning of Nanoparticles and Polymers Enabled by Vapor Permeable Polymer Templates

Michael Demko
Alberto P. Pisano
Liwei Lin
Ming C. Wu
2012
The structure and chemistry of nanoparticles and polymers are interesting for applications in electronics and sensors. However, because they are outside of the standard material set typically used for these applications, widespread use of these materials has not yet been realized. This is due in part to the limited ability of traditional manufacturing processes to adapt to these unique materials. As a result, several alternative manufacturing methods have been developed, including nanoimprint lithography,...

Jeffrey Chou

Alumni
Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences
Professor Ming C. Wu (Advisor)
Ph.D. 2012

Metal-optic and Plasmonic Semiconductor-based Nanolasers

Amit Lakhani
Ming C. Wu
Xiang Zhang
Eli Yablonovitch
2012

Over the past few decades, semiconductor lasers have relentlessly followed the path towards miniaturization. Smaller lasers are more energy efficient, are cheaper to make, and open up new applications in sensing and displays, among many other things. Yet, up until recently, there was a fundamental problem with making lasers smaller: purely semiconductor lasers couldn't be made smaller than the diffraction limit of light.

In recent years, however, metal-based lasers have been demonstrated in the nanoscale that have shattered the diffraction limit. As optical materials, metals can be...

MEMS Lens Scanners for Free-Space Optical Interconnects

Jeffrey Chou
Ming C. Wu
Bernhard E. Boser
Liwei Lin
2011

Optical interconnects are the next evolutionary step for computer server systems, replacing traditional copper interconnects to increase communication bandwidth and reduce overall power consumption. A variety of implementation techniques to bring optics to the rack-to-rack, board-to-board, and chip-to-chip scale are heavily pursued in the research space. In this dissertation we present a micro-electro mechanical systems (MEMS) based free-space optical link for board-to-board interconnects.

As with any free-space optical system, alignment is critical for the correction of undesired...

Karen Grutter

Alumni
Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences
Professor Ming C. Wu (Advisor)
Ph.D. 2013

Optical Whispering-Gallery Mode Resonators for Applications in Optical Communication and Frequency Control

Karen Grutter
Ming C. Wu
Clark T.-C. Nguyen
Liwei Lin
2013

High quality factor (Q) optical whispering gallery mode resonators are a key component in many on-chip optical systems, such as delay lines, modulators, and add-drop filters. They are also a convenient, compact structure for studying optomechanical interactions on-chip. In all these applications, optical Q is an important factor for high performance. For optomechanical reference oscillators in particular, high mechanical Q is also necessary. Previously, optical microresonators have been made in a wide variety of materials, but it has proven challenging to demonstrate high optical Q and...