Ming C. Wu (Advisor)

Research Advised by Professor Ming C. Wu

Co-planar Optoelectrowetting (OEW) Device for Droplet Manipulation

Jodi Loo
2020

Lab-on-a-chip technologies have seen great advances and development over the past few decades in addressing applications such as biochemical analysis, pharmaceutical development, and point-of-care diagnostics. Miniaturization of biochemical operations performed on lab-on-a-chip platforms benefit from reduced sample, reagent and waste volumes as well as increased parallelization and automation. This enables more cost-effective operations along with higher throughput and sensitivity for faster and more efficient analysis and detection.

The research presented in this dissertation...

Jean-Etienne Tremblay

Alumni
Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences
Professor Ming C. Wu (Advisor)
Ph.D. 2020

Received a B.Eng. in Engineering Physics at Polytechnique Montréal. Jean-Etienne is currently a Ph.D. candidate in Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences at UC Berkeley with Prof. Ming Wu. His interests are nonlinear integrated photonics and photonics packaging.

BPN912: Optoelectronic Packaging and Multi-Chip Integration

Jean-Etienne Tremblay
2020

Heterogeneous integration of optical integrated components promises to bridge the gap in functionality of different material platforms currently in use. For example, high performance gain materials such as indium phosphide can now be integrated with reliable silicon photonic circuits to create sophisticated tunable light sources. We propose a multi-chip heterogeneous integration platform using edge coupling to couple light in-between chips and evanescent coupling to couple light to optical fibers. The proposed optoelectronic packaging scheme enables applications for low power, large...

Jodi Loo

Alumni
Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences
Professor Ming C. Wu (Advisor)
Ph.D. 2020

Jodi Loo is a PhD student under Professor Ming Wu in the Electrical Engineering & Computer Sciences department at UC Berkeley. Her primary research interests are optoelectronics and biophotonics and currently works on Light-Actuated Digital Microfluidic (LADM) systems based on the principle of Optoelectrowetting (OEW). She is a part of UC Berkeley Photobears (the UC Berkeley student chapter of OSA, SPIE, and IEEE Photonics Society), of which she acts as chair for the IEEE Photonics Society. She is a recipient of the NSF Graduate Research Fellowship and completed her B.S. in Electrical...

BPN552: Light-Actuated Digital Microfluidics (Optoelectrowetting)

Jodi Loo
2020

The ability to quickly perform large numbers of chemical and biological reactions in parallel using low reagent volumes is a field well addressed by droplet-based digital microfluidics. Compared to continuous flow-based techniques, digital microfluidics offers the added advantages such as individual sample addressing and reagent isolation. We are developing a Light- Actuated Digital Microfluidics device (also known as optoelectrowetting) that optically manipulates nano- to micro-liter scale aqueous droplets on the device surface. The device possesses many advantages including ease of...

Kyungmok Kwon

Postdoctoral Researcher
Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences
Professor Ming C. Wu (Advisor)

Dr. Kyungmok Kwon graduated from KAIST, Korea, with a Ph.D degree in Electrical Engineering. His research area is silicon-photonics, nanophotonics, nanoengineering and nanomaterial. Kyungmok is currently a postdoctoral researcher in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at UC Berkeley where he is working with Prof. Ming Wu on MEMS and silicon photonics.

Monolayer Transition Metal Dichalcogenide NanoLEDs: Towards High Speed and High Efficiency

Kevin Han
2019

On-chip optical interconnects promise to drastically reduce energy consumption compared to electrical interconnects, which dominate power dissipation in modern integrated circuits (ICs). One key requirement is a low-power, high-efficiency, and high-speed nanoscale light source. However, existing III-V semiconductor light sources face a high surface recombination velocity (SRV ~ 104 – 106 cm/s) that greatly reduces efficiency at nanoscale sizes. An alternative material system is the monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs), single-molecule-thick direct-bandgap semiconductors...