Spring 2011 Conference
March 9 - 11
      

Spring 2011 Conference - Speaker Biographies

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Speakers
 

 
 Mehmet Akgul, Sr. Design Engineer, InvenSense, Inc.
Mehmet Akgul (BS'07) received his B.S. degree in electrical and electronics engineering from Middle East Technical University, Ankara, Turkey as 2nd of his class in 2007. He is currently working towards his PhD degree at University of California, Berkeley with Prof. Clark Nguyen.
His research focuses on design, microfabrication, and testing of large scale micromechanical circuits using capacitively transduced resonators as the building block, with primary focus on RF-channel select filter banks capable of selecting individual narrow-band channels directly at RF frequencies for true cognitive radio applications. His work also extends into improving capacitive resonator performance by using high-Q resonator materials, such as polydiamond; and strengthening electromechanical coupling via capacitive gap scaling by using ALD deposited high-k dielectrics.

See also: http://www.invensense.com

 


 
 Elad Alon, Associate Professor, University of California, Berkeley
received the B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in Electrical
Engineering from Stanford University in 2001, 2002, and 2006, respectively.
In Jan. 2007, he joined the University of California at Berkeley as an Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences, where he is now a co-director of the Berkeley Wireless Research Center (BWRC). He has held positions at Sun Labs, Intel, AMD, Rambus, Hewlett Packard, and IBM Research, where he worked on digital, analog, and mixed-signal integrated circuits for computing, test and measurement, and high-speed communications.

Dr. Alon received the IBM Faculty Award in 2008, the 2009 Hellman Family Faculty Fund Award, the 2010 UC Berkeley Electrical Engineering Outstanding Teaching Award, and the 2010 ISSCC Jack Raper Award for Outstanding Technology Directions Paper. His research focuses on energy-efficient integrated systems, including the circuit, device, communications, and optimization techniques used to design them.

See also: http://www.eecs.berkeley.edu/~elad/

 

  Mark Banister, Founder/Chief Technical Officer, Medipacs, Inc.
Mark Banister is the inventor of the Medipacs pump system and unique polymer actuator materials. He has 5 issued patents and 16 pending patents and has authored several published technical papers on smart polymer materials and devices. Mark has over 30 years of experience in business, product design, polymer chemistry, mechanical engineering, manufacturing and tooling design. Currently the PI on a National Science Foundation STTR Phase II Grant, Mark has been able to leverage over $1M in grant funding into over $3M in angel funding.

 


 
 Sun Choi, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
is currently a MS/Ph.D student in mechanical engineering at UC Berkeley. His Research interests are involved with Bio-MEMS/Nano Devices, Microfluidics, IC Devices and integration of them. He joined BMAD November, 2007. Mr.Choi received his B.S. degree in Mechanical Engineering in Seoul National University(SNU) in Aug, 2006 and M.S.in Mechanical Engineering in UC Berkeley in Dec. 2008.

See also: http://www.lbl.gov

 


 
 Michael Cohen, OTL Director, University of California, Berkeley

See also: http://ipira.berkeley.edu

 

  Alexander Frey, Siemens AG
Alexander Frey received his M.A. degree from the University of Texas, Austin, in 1994, the Dipl. Phys. degree from the University of Wuerzburg, Germany in 1997 and the PhD from the Saarland University, Germany in 2010. In 1997 he joined the Research Laboratories of Siemens and was involved in the design of DRAM sensing circuits. During this time he worked as a Siemens Delegate at the Giga Bite DRAM Alliance in Fishkill (NY). In 1999 he joined Corporate Research, Infineon in Munich, Germany. He was engaged in the research of analog and mixed signal CMOS design for electrochemical sensing circuits and biosensors. Results of his work were awarded with the German Innovation Price 2004. Rejoining the Research Laboratories of Siemens in 2005 he works as a scientist and project manager. He is the co-inventor of more than 27 patents in MEMS and ASIC related topics and has authored or co-authored more than 50 publications. His current research interests are in the field of CMOS-based biosensors and energy autonomous microsystems.

 

  Fabian Goericke, Project Manager/Technology Development Engineer, Siemens AG
Fabian Goericke received his M.S. degree in mechanical engineering from Georgia Tech in 2007, his Dipl.-Ing. degree in mechanical engineering from TU Braunschweig (Germany) in 2009 and his Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from UC Berkeley in 2013. He is currently working as Project Manager/Technology Development Engineer for Siemens Energy.

 


 
 Andre Guedes, MEMS & Sensor Design Lead, Chirp Microsystems
received his M.Sc. in Physics Engineering from UTL (Technical University of Lisbon) in 2004 and the Ph.D. in Physics Engineering from UTL in 2010, with the following title: Hybrid devices for ultra low magnetic field detection. He conducted his Ph.D. research at the INESC-MN laboratory where he was responsible for the design, fabrication and optimization of highly sensitive magnetoresistive sensors, namely magnetic spin valves and tunnel junctions. Moreover, he conducted research in the integration of these sensors with MEMS resonators, a hybrid device aimed to improve the field sensitivity of the magnetic sensors, and also to provide on-chip magnetic detection of resonance in MEMS. Currently he is a postdoctoral researcher at UC Davis and BSAC, conducting research in piezoelectric MEMS devices and magnetic sensors.

See also: http://www.chirpmicro.com

 


 
 Adrienne T. Higa, Associate, Exponent
received her B.S. Degree in Mechanical Engineering in 2004 from the University of California, Berkeley and her M.S. Degree in Biomedical Engineering in 2006 from the University of California, Los Angeles. She is currently a 5th year graduate student with Professor Liwei Lin at the University of California, Berkeley, pursuing her Ph.D., and collaborates with Professors Song Li and Dorian Liepmann. Adrienne's current research interests include mechanical guidance and regulation of single and collective cells using microtopographic substrates.

See also: http://www.exponent.com

 

  Daniel Huang
finished his Ph.D in 2009 (UC Berkeley, EECS). His thesis focused on the thin-film growth of a organic semiconductor. After graduation he joined the Maharbiz group and BSAC doing research in synthetic biology.

 

  Igor Izyumin, BSAC Researcher
Igor received B.S. degrees in electrical engineering and computer science from the University of Missouri, Rolla in 2008. He is currently pursuing the Ph.D. degree in electrical engineering in Prof. Bernhard Boser's group at the University of California, Berkeley. His research interests include MEMS sensor interfaces and mixed-signal integrated circuit design.

See also: /directory/zoom.php?PersonID=1219425198

 

  Rehan Kapadia, Assistant Professor, University of Southern California
Rehan received his B.S. degree in electrical engineering from the University of Texas, Austin in 2008. After receiving his degree, he started at UC Berkeley and joined the Javey Research Group. He is currently exploring the potential of compound semiconductor-on-insulator (XOI) devices based on InAs as the active channel material through device fabrication, characterization and modeling.

 


 
 Yang Lin, Silicon Labs
received the B.S. and M.S. degrees from Tsinghua University, Beijing in 2003 and 2005 respectively in Precision Instrument. He received another M.S. degree from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor in 2007 in Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences. Since 2007, he is a Ph.D student in Department Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences, the University of California at Berkeley, working with Prof. Clark Nguyen. His Ph.D thesis mainly focuses on micromechanical resonant switches (dubbed "resoswitch"), and the applications of this novel type of MEMS switches such as DC-DC power converters and power amplifiers.

See also: http://www.silabs.com

 


 
 Cary L. Pint, Assistant Professor, Vanderbilt University

See also: http://engineering.vanderbilt.edu/me/faculty-staff/cary-pint.php

 


 
 Albert P. Pisano, Dean, Jacobs School of Engineering, University of California, San Diego
In his role as Dean of the Jacobs School of Engineering, Albert P. Pisano is responsible for strategic planning and programmatic development. His responsibilities include School-wide research initiatives, space plans, academic affairs, strategic planning and operations, and UC San Diego-wide cooperative initiatives.
As Dean of the Jacobs School, Pisano holds the Walter J. Zable Chair in Engineering. He is an active researcher who serves on the faculty of the departments of mechanical and aerospace engineering and electrical and computer engineering.
Prior to September 2013, Pisano served on the UC Berkeley faculty. The FANUC Endowed Chair of Mechanical Systems, he held faculty appointments in mechanical engineering and in electrical engineering and computer sciences. Pisano served as senior co-Director of the Berkeley Sensor & Actuator Center (an NSF Industry-University Cooperative Research Center), Director of the Electronics Research Laboratory (UC Berkeley’s largest organized research unit), and Faculty Head of the Program Office for Operational Excellence, among other leadership positions.
In 2001, Pisano was elected to the National Academy of Engineering for contributions to the design, fabrication, commercialization, and educational aspects of MEMS. From 1997 to 1999, Pisano served as a program manager for the MEMS Program at the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA).
He is a Fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, and an awardee of the Thomas Egleston Medal forDistinguished Engineering Achievement by notable alumni of Columbia University.
Pisano earned his undergraduate (’76) and graduate degrees (’77, ’80, ’81) in mechanical engineering at Columbia University. Prior to joining the faculty at UC Berkeley, he held research positions with Xerox Palo Alto Research Center, Singer Sewing Machines Corporate R&D Center and General Motors Research Labs.

See also: http://www.jacobsschool.ucsd.edu/about/about_leadership/leadership_dean/pisano.sfe

 


 
 Joseph R. Stetter, President, CTO, KWJ Engineering
Dr. Stetter obtained a Ph.D. in Physical Chemistry from the University at Buffalo (SUNY) in 1975. In the 1970s, Dr. Stetter was Director of Chemical Research at the Energetics Sciences Division of Becton Dickinson and Company [a fortune 500 company] where he developed the first diffusion-type electrochemical CO sensors; the earliest diffusion CO dosimeters; solid-state gas sensors for CO, NOx, SO2, other toxic gases, and an electrochemical hydrazine sensor still in use by NASA. While at the Argonne National Laboratory in Chicago, IL in the 1980s, he led the development of the first integrated and operational “sensor-array-based” instrument with pattern recognition (now called electronic nose). In the 80s, Dr Stetter founded TRI [Transducer Research, Inc.] where he developed portable instruments and sensors for CO, CO2, end of service filter indicators, chlorinated hydrocarbon sensors, NOx sensors, personal protection instruments, and low cost effective protection equipment for human health and the environment. In the 90′s, he sold TRI and became Professor of Chemistry at the Illinois Institute of Technology, started the sensor research group, taught in both chemistry and business schools, founded the International Center for Sensor Research and Engineering at IIT, and mentored both MS and PhD students. He founded Transducer Technology, Inc. [TTI] a startup company focusing on nano-technology enabled sensors and instruments in 1999. In 2007 TTI merged with KWJ Engineering, Inc of Newark, CA making nano-sensors for health, safety and process control applications. Currently and since 2004, Dr. Stetter is Director of the Microsystems Innovation Center for SRI International [Menlo Park, CA]. SRI’s Research and Engineering work focuses on new sensors, unique structures/materials, artificial senses, chem/bio sensors, novel MEMS for drug and vaccine delivery; vacuum microelectronics including micro electron and ion sources, and micro/nano-structures and bio-MEMS. Dr. Stetter has published more than 200 technical articles, written book chapters, and has more than 30 domestic and foreign patents. He has served as Chairman of the Electrochemical Society Sensor Division and served on the boards of national and international technical societies. He has organized national and international scientific meetings and symposia in his field and serves as editor and reviewer for scientific and engineering journals. His awards include three IR-100 Awards for new product development; the Federal Laboratory Consortium Special Award for Excellence in Technology Transfer; the Argonne National Laboratory Inventor’s award; the Technology Management Association of Chicago’s 2002 “Entrepreneur-of-the-Year” award, and two NASA New Technology Awards. He is also on the board of directors for several start-up companies. There are many commercial products based on Dr. Stetter’s work that are in worldwide use today, protecting human health and the environment as well as providing industrial analysis.

See also: http://www.kwjengineering.com

 

  Richard Su
received the B.S. degree in computer engineering from the University of Maryland, College Park, MD, in 2004. Since then, he has been a graduate student in electrical engineering at University of California, Berkeley, CA. He interned at Broadcom Corporation as a design engineer in summer 2007 and Advanced Micro Devices (AMD) in summer 2006.

 


 
 Shin Takano, Director, Murata Electronics North America, Inc.

See also: http://www.murata-northamerica.com

 


 
 Paul Wright, Professor, University of California, Berkeley
was appointed Acting Director of CITRIS and the Banatao Institute@CITRIS in July 2007. In December of 2008 he was formally made CITRIS Director. He is a professor in the UC Berkeley mechanical engineering department, where he holds the A. Martin Berlin Chair. Wright also serves as co-chair of the Management of Technology Program (a joint program with the Haas School of Business), co-director of the Berkeley Manufacturing Institute and co-director of the Berkeley Wireless Research Center.

His research and teaching are in high-tech product design and rapid manufacturing. He and his colleagues are designing and prototyping battery-less wireless systems for demand response power management throughout California, funded by PIER (Public Interest Energy Research). These wireless prototypes are being created in the Ford Lab a 2,000 square foot design studio in the mechanical engineering department. Born in London England, he attended Birmingham and Cambridge Universities prior to previous U.S. faculty positions at New York University and Carnegie Mellon University. He was elected in 2007 a Fellow of the National Academy of Engineers.

Wrights recent research accomplishments are in Internet-based CAD/CAM Systems based on the CyberCut-CyberBuild project. The studio has prototyped energy-scavenging, pico-radio systems for the Berkeley Wireless Research Center, small mote platforms for the Intel Berkeley Research Lab., fire-rescue products for the Chicago Fire Department, and in-tire sensors for Pirelli. All these projects are under the CITRIS umbrella.

See also: http://www.me.berkeley.edu/faculty/wright/

 


 
 Byung-Wook Yoo, Senior MEMS Design Engineer, Qualcomm
received his B.S., M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from Seoul National University in 2005, 2007 and 2010, respectively. He is currently a Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of California, Berkeley. His research interests are modeling, design, fabrication and testing of Optical MEMS, Nanophotonics, Optomechanics, Nano-fabrication, and Packaging

See also: http://www.qualcomm.com/pixtronix

 
 
BSAC Directors
 

 
Bernhard E. Boser is a professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and a Co-Director of the Berkeley Sensor & Actuator Center and the UC Berkeley Swarm Lab. His current research interests include; analog and digital circuit design and micromechanical sensors and actuators.

Prior to joining BSAC, Professor Boser conducted industrial research as Member of Technical Staff, AT&T Bell Laboratories, Holmdel, NJ (1988-1991) where he worked on adaptive systems, hardware implementations for neural network applications- including special purpose integrated circuits, and digital signal processors-and simulation of neural networks on parallel processors. He was Editor in Chief of IEEE Journal of Solid State Circuits, from 2002-2004. Professor Boser has served on the program committees of the IEEE International Solid-State Circuits Conference, the Transducers Conference, and the VLSI Symposium.

Professor Boser received a B.S. from the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH Zurich) in 1984 and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from Stanford University (1985/1988).
See also:  http://www.eecs.berkeley.edu/~boser
 


 
David A. Horsley is a professor in the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering and Vice Chair for Graduate Studies at the University of California, Davis and a Co-Director of the Berkeley Sensor & Actuator Center.

Prior to joining the faculty at UC Davis, Professor Horsley held research and development positions at Dicon Fiberoptics, Hewlett Packard Laboratories, and Onix Microsystems. His research interests include microfabricated sensors and actuators with applications in optical MEMS, communication, displays, and physical and biological sensors.

Professor Horsley is a recipient of the NSF CAREER Award and the UC Davis College of Engineering’s Outstanding Junior Faculty Award.

Professor Horsley received B.S. and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in mechanical engineering at the University of California, Berkeley, CA, in 1992, 1994, and 1998 respectively.
See also:  http://faculty.engineering.ucdavis.edu/horsley/
 


 
John M. Huggins Executive Director, Berkeley Sensor & Actuator Center, UC Berkeley (since September 2002). MS, Electrical Engineering, University of Minnesota (1973); Stanford High Tech Executive Institute. Founder & CEO of TDK Systems Inc; VP, Advanced Development, Silicon Systems Inc; Telecom development manager, Intel Corporation. Guest Editor and Associate Editor, IEEE Journal of Solid State Circuits; Technical Program Committee, International Solid State Circuits Conference 5 years. Chair, PCMCIA communications standards subcommittee. Five U.S. Patents. Research and professional interests: mixed signal CMOS integrated circuits, electronic communications, and telecommunications high tech business development.
See also:  http://www-bsac.eecs.berkeley.edu/project/list_projects_by_director.php?PersonID=1086
 


 
Ali Javey is an associate professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences at the University of California, Berkeley. He is also a faculty scientist at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory where he serves as the program leader of Electronic Materials (E-Mat). He is an associate editor of ACS Nano and the Bay Area PV Consortium (BAPVC) and a Co-Director of the Berkeley Sensor & Actuator Center.

Professor Javey's research interests encompass the fields of chemistry, materials science and electrical engineering. His work focuses on the integration of nanoscale electronic materials for various technological applications, including novel nanoelectronics, flexible circuits and sensors, and energy generation and harvesting. For his contributions to the field, he has received a number of awards, including the APEC Science Prize for Innovation, Research and Education (2011); IEEE Nanotechnology Early Career Award (2010); Alfred P. Sloan Fellow (2010); Mohr Davidow Ventures Innovators Award (2010); National Academy of Sciences Award for Initiatives in Research (2009); Technology Review TR35 (2009); NSF Early CAREER Award (2008); U.S. Frontiers of Engineering by National Academy of Engineering (2008).

Professor Javey received a Ph.D. in chemistry from Stanford University in 2005, and served as a Junior Fellow of Harvard Society of Fellows from 2005 to 2006.
See also:  http://nano.eecs.berkeley.edu
 


 
Luke P. Lee is the Arnold and Barbara Silverman Distinguished Professor of Bioengineering at the University of California, Berkeley, a Co-Director of the Berkeley Sensor & Actuator Center, and the Director of the Biomedical Institute of Global Healthcare Research & Technology (BIGHEART).

Professor Lee’s current research interests are bionanoscience, nanomedicine for global healthcare and personalized medicine, and Bioinspired Photonics-Optofluidics-Electronics Technology and Science (BioPOETS) for green building with living skin. He was Chair Professor in Systems Nanobiology at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH, Zurich) and has more than ten years of industrial experience in integrated optoelectronics, Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices (SQUIDs), and biomagnetic assays.

Professor Lee is a is a 2010 Ho-Am Laureate and has authored and co-authored over 250 papers on bionanophotonics, microfluidics, single cell biology, quantitative biomedicine, molecular diagnostics, optofluidics, BioMEMS, biosensors, SQUIDs, SERS, and nanogap junction biosensor for label-free biomolecule detection.

Professor Lee received his B.A. in Biophysics and Ph.D. in Applied Science & Technology: Applied Physics (major) / Bioengineering (minor) from the University of California, Berkeley.
See also:  http://biopoems.berkeley.edu
 


 
Dorian Liepmann is a professor in the Departments of Bioengineering and Mechanical Engineering at UC Berkeley and Co-Director of the Berkeley Sensor & Actuator Center.

Professor Liepmann has been a faculty member for 21 years. He was Chair of the Dept. of Bioengineering from 2004 to 2010 and held the Lester John and Lynne Dewar Distinguished Professorship in Bioengineering from 2001 to 2005. His research interests include BioMEMS, microfluid dynamics, experimental biofluid dynamics, hemodynamics associated with valvular heart disease and other cardiac and arterial flows.

Prior to joining the faculty at the University of California, Berkeley, Professor Liepmann had ten years of industrial research experience at the Jet Propulsion Labs and the Institute for Non-Linear Science at UC San Diego.

Professor Liepmann received his Ph.D. in 1990 from the University of California, San Diego in Applied Mechanics.
See also:  http://bioeng.berkeley.edu/people/cv?facultyid=3034; http://LiepmannLab.squarespace.com
 


 
Liwei Lin is a professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at UC Berkeley and a Co-Director of the Berkeley Sensor & Actuator Center. His research interests are in micro/nano electromechanical systems, including design, modeling and fabrication of micro/nano structures, micro/nano sensors and micro/nano actuators.

Professor Lin worked with BEI Electronics from 1993 to 1994 in research and development of microsensors. From 1994 to 1996 he was an Associate Professor at the Institute of Applied Mechanics, National Taiwan University. From 1996 to 1999 he was an Assistant Professor at the Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics Department at the University of Michigan.

Professor Lin is the recipient of the 1998 NSF Career Award for research in MEMS Packaging and the 1999 ASME Journal of Heat Transfer best paper award for his work on micro-scale bubble formation. He led the effort in establishing the MEMS division in ASME and is the founding Chairman of the Executive Committee and an ASME Fellow. He is a subject editor for IEEE/ASME Journal of Microelectromechanical Systems, the North and South America Editor for Sensors and Actuators A Physical, and Associate Editor, ASME Journal of Micro- and Nano-Manufacturing. Furthermore, Professor Lin holds 15 US patents in the area of MEMS.

He received his M.S. and Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering from the University of California, Berkeley in 1991 and 1993, respectively.
See also:  http://www.me.berkeley.edu/faculty/lin/index.html
 


 
Roya Maboudian is a professor of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering and a co-Director of the Berkeley Sensor & Actuator Center at the University of California, Berkeley. She is currently serving as editor to the IEEE Journal of Microelectromechanical Systems (JMEMS), as associate editor to IEEE/SPIE Journal on Micro/Nanolithography, MEMS and MOEMS (JM3), and as advisory board member to ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces (AMI).

Prof. Maboudian's research interest is in the surface/interface and materials science and engineering of micro/nanosystems, with applications in harsh-environment sensing, health and environmental monitoring, and energy technologies. Prof. Maboudian has coauthored over 250 papers in peer-reviewed archival journals. She is the recipient of several awards, including the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE) from the White House, NSF Young Investigator award, and the Beckman Young Investigator award.

Prof. Maboudian received her B.S. degree in Electrical Engineering from the Catholic University of America, Washington, D.C., and her M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Applied Physics from the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.
See also:  http://cheme.berkeley.edu/people/faculty/maboudian
 


 
Michel M. Maharbiz is an associate professor with the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at the University of California, Berkeley and a Co-Director of the Berkeley Sensor & Actuator Center. His current research interests include building micro/nano interfaces to cells and organisms and exploring bio-derived fabrication methods.

Professor Maharbiz’s work on microbioreactor systems under Professor Roger T. Howe (EECS) and Professor Jay D. Keasling (ChemE) led to the foundation of Microreactor Technologies, Inc., which was acquired by Pall Corporation in 2009. From 2003 to 2007, he was an assistant professor at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. He is the co-founder of Tweedle Technologies and served as Vice President of Product Development at Quswami, Inc. from July 2010 to June 2011.

Professor Maharbiz was the recipient of a 2009 NSF Career Award for research into developing microfabricated interfaces for synthetic biology. In 2013 He received an Excellence in Engineering Education Award from National Instruments. He has been a GE Scholar and an Intel IMAP Fellow. His group is also known for developing the world’s first remotely radio-controlled cyborg beetles. This was named one of the top ten emerging technologies of 2009 by MIT’s Technology Review (TR10) and was in Time Magazine’s Top 50 Inventions of 2009. Michel’s long term goal is to understand developmental mechanisms as a way to engineer and fabricate machines.

Professor Maharbiz received his Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley.
See also:  http://www.eecs.berkeley.edu/~maharbiz
 


 
Richard S. Muller is a professor emeritus in the Department of Electrical Engineering at the University of California, Berkeley and Co-Founding Director of the Berkeley Sensor & Actuator Center. He joined the faculty at the University of California, Berkeley in 1962 where his research focus was on the physics of integrated circuit devices.

Together with Dr. T.I. Kamins of Hewlett-Packard Company, Professor Muller published Device Electronics for Integrated Circuits in 1977. In the late 1970s he began research in the area now known as MEMS, and with R.M. White founded the Berkeley Sensor & Actuator Center in 1986.

He proposed and serves as Editor-in-Chief of IEEE JMEMS. A member of the US National Academy of Engineering and an IEEE Life Fellow, he received the career MEMS Award at TRANSDUCERS ’97, as well as the IEEE Brunetti Award (1998 with R.T. Howe), a Fulbright Professorship, and a von Humboldt Research Award at TU Berlin in 1994. Other awards include the Berkeley Citation, the IEEE Millennium Medal, and the Renaissance Award from Stevens Institute of Technology. Professor Muller served as a Trustee of Stevens Institute of Technology from 1996 to 2005. In 2013, Professor Muller was a co-recipient of the IEEE/RSE/Wolfson, James Clerk Maxwell Award with Professor Richard White.

Professor Muller earned his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering and physics from the California Institute of Technology.
See also:  http://bsac.eecs.berkeley.edu/~muller
 


 
Clark T.-C. Nguyen is a professor of Electrical Engineering and a Co-Director of the Berkeley Sensor & Actuator Center. His technical interests focus on microelectromechanical systems and include integrated vibrating micromechanical signal processors and sensors, merged circuit/micromechanical technologies, RF communication architectures and integrated circuit design and technology.

Previously, Professor Nguyen was a professor of Electrical Engineering at the University of Michigan and a DARPA Program Manager in the Microsystems Technology Office (MTO). He managed many DARPA programs including Micro Power Generation (MPG), Chip-Scale Atomic Clock (CSAC), MEMS Exchange (MX), Harsh Environment Robust Micromechanical Technology (HERMiT), Micro Gas Analyzers (MGA), Radio Isotope Micropower Sources (RIMS), RF MEMS Improvement (RFMIP), Navigation-Grade Integrated Micro Gyroscope (NGIMG) and Micro Cryogenic Coolers (MCC).

Professor Nguyen and his students have garnered numerous Best Paper Awards at prestigious conferences including the 1998 and 2003 IEEE International Electron Devices Meetings, the 2004 IEEE Ultrasonics Symposium, the 2004 DARPA Tech Conference, and the 2004 IEEE Custom Integrated Circuits Conference. In 2001, Professor Nguyen founded Discera, Inc., a company established to commercialize communication products based upon MEMS technology, with an initial focus on the vibrating micromechanical resonators pioneered by his research in prior years. He served as Vice President and Acting Chief Technology Officer (CTO) of Discera from 2001 to mid-2002.

Professor Nguyen received B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences from the University of California, Berkeley, in 1989, 1991, and 1994, respectively.
See also:  http://www.eecs.berkeley.edu/~ctnguyen
 


 
Kristofer S.J. Pister is a professor in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences at the University of California, Berkeley and is a Co-Director of the Berkeley Sensor & Actuator Center. From 1992 to 1997 he was an assistant professor of Electrical Engineering at the University of California, Los Angeles.
He created the term "Smart Dust" and pioneered the development of ubiquitous networks of communication sensors, a concept that has since become a vital sector of technology R&D. During 2003 and 2004 he was on industrial leave as CEO and then CTO of Dust Networks, a company that he co-founded to commercialize low-power wireless sensor networks. In addition to wireless sensor networks, his research interests include MEMS-based microrobotics and low-power circuit design.
Professor Pister received a B.A. degree in applied physics from the University of California, San Diego (1982), and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering from the University of California, Berkeley (1989/1992).
See also:  http://wsn.eecs.berkeley.edu/index.php
 


 
Richard M. White is a professor emeritus in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences and a Co-Founding Director of the Berkeley Sensor & Actuator Center. Current research interests include wireless microsensors and energy scavenging devices for use in electric power systems and a portable particulate matter monitor for measuring concentrations of airborne aerosols and diesel exhaust particulates.

Professor White conducted microwave device research at General Electric before joining the faculty of the University of California, Berkeley, in 1962.

Professor White also holds numerous U.S. patents and has co-authored texts and reference books on Solar Cells (1983), Acoustic Wave Sensors (1997), and Electronics (2001). In addition to the 2003 Rayleigh Award of the IEEE for seminal contributions to surface acoustic wave technology, Professor White is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, a Fellow of the IEEE and the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and is the recipient of many academic awards including the IEEE Cledo Brunetti Award (1986), U.C. Berkeley Chancellor's Professorship, and the 2003 U.C. Berkeley Community Service citation award. In 2013, Professor White was a co-recipient of the IEEE/RSE/Wolfson, James Clerk Maxwell Award with Professor Richard Muller.

Professor White received his Ph.D. degree from Harvard University in Applied Physics in 1956.
See also:  http://www-bsac.eecs.berkeley.edu/project/list_projects_by_director.php?PersonID=705
 


 
Ming C. Wu is Nortel Distinguished Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences and Co-director of the Berkeley Sensor & Actuator Center at the University of California, Berkeley. He is also the Faculty Director of UC Berkeley Marvell Nanolab.

From 1988 to 1992, he was a Member of Technical Staff at AT&T Bell Laboratories, Murray Hill, New Jersey. From 1992 to 2004, he was a professor in the Electrical Engineering department at the University of California, Los Angeles, where he also served as Vice Chair for Industrial Affiliate Program and Director of Nano-electronics Research Facility. He has been a faculty member at Berkeley since 2004.

His research interests include MEMS (micro-electro-mechanical systems), MOEMS, semiconductor optoelectronics, nanophotonics, and biophotonics. He has published 8 book chapters, over 200 journal papers and 300 conference papers. He is the holder of 22 U.S. patents. Professor Wu is a Fellow of IEEE and was a Packard Foundation Fellow (1992-1997). He received the 2007 Paul F. Forman Engineering Excellence Award from Optical Society of America.

Professor Wu received M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences from the University of California, Berkeley, in 1986 and 1988, respectively.

See also:  http://www.eecs.berkeley.edu/Faculty/Homepages/wu.html
 

 

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